Pages are falling,
and I’m always replacing.
They never look just right.

I’m haunted by red bougainvillea
blooming
along the King Kamehameha Highway

so thick the road crews
hack it down with chainsaws,
and still the seeds

hurl themselves
into a sliver of dirt
and catch fire in the sunset.

I’ll flip another page and find a field
of abandoned sugar cane.
Anything can grow here.
Remaining is hard.

Two hundred words for rain in Hawaii—
rain that causes creeks to flow up
the Ko’olau mountains,
and rain that tells fishermen
it’s time to haul in their nets.

Image credit:meriç tuna

Trish Saunders lives in Seattle. Her poetry and short fiction are published or forthcoming in The American Journal of Poetry, Califragile, Pacifica Poetry Review, Right Hand Pointing, Eunoia Review, Silver Birch Press, Seattle Poetry Bus, and other places. She's been nominated for Best of the Net (These Mountains Will Break Your Heart, If You Let Them), and the Pushcart Prize (Surly Modern Birds).Right Hand Pointing published her chapbook, "Last Note" in 2019.